Yesterday’s Encore

This past week it was determined (no, 100% confirmed); I am a repeat offender of the redo. I literally can’t end a day without some sort of variation of the following conclusion…

Wish that would have gone better. Why did I say that? Why did I do that? I should be better.

These inner conclusions are muddled and unfair because they are reactionary and, embarrassingly, indulgent.

Us repeat redo offenders must remain sunrise-obsessed. We have to be ever-eager of our next moment because a redo is drastically and novelly distinguished from a do-over. A do-over suggests that there was nothing worth saving, worth learning, worth appreciating, nor worth noting from the past. On the eloquent other hand, a redo suggests that everything was worth saving, worth learning, worth appreciating and worth noting from the past. It takes courage to hear a variant of inner dialogue; self judgment is a passive stance. Action is the only way beyond self-doubt. A redo invites refinement. It offers improvement. It extends grace.

A redo is a unique kind of encore.

Tomorrow, we should all cheer one another back out and onto the stage for yesterday’s encore. I am not sure I always deserve this applause and, I am certain, that I often forget to put my hands together for someone else’s second chance. I think it could matter if we did.

Tomorrow is not a do-over; the past will not be scrapped. Tomorrow will be a revision of the present.

1 Comment

  1. From redo to revision, I love the way you play with words. These lines especially caught me: “A do-over suggests that there was nothing worth saving, worth learning, worth appreciating, nor worth noting from the past. On the eloquent other hand, a redo suggests that everything…” A few small words’ difference might go unrecognized, like the subtleties in each sunrise that go unnoticed unless we are actively seeking the encore! Well done!!

    Like

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